Got Milk?

Rich, creamy, delicious, refreshing.

Four words that can only be used to describe one thing- chocolate milk. Virginia Tech students agree that this heavenly beverage found at D2 is one of the campus’s most prized possessions.

It’s not only the taste that attracts students to this milky goodness. The true pride lies in the fact that it’s directly from Kentland Farm, making it all the more special. While the D2 dining hall also offers drinks such as soda and juice, the supply for the milk is always running low.

While waiting in line, many students question what makes the chocolate milk so good. We interviewed Vy Nguyen, a governor’s school student who is one of many fans.

Interviewer: Have you tried the chocolate milk from D2?

Vy: Yes, I have!

Interviewer: How do you feel about the chocolate milk?

Vy: I love it, it’s the best thing I’ve ever had.

Interviewer: Why do you say that?

Vy: Well, it’s really thick, creamy, and chocolatey. I know some people don’t like the super sweet taste that comes with it, but I love it.

Interviewer: After taking a class on dairy science, did you gain more appreciation for the chocolate milk here on campus?

Vy: Definitely, especially because I found out it was produced here at Virginia Tech – which explains the fresh taste. It’s pretty cool to think that just a few days ago, the milk was just coming out of the udders, and now I’m drinking it.

Interviewer: I couldn’t agree more. Thanks for your time, Vy!

Vy: Thank you!

Governor’s school students have been able to learn more about the process of how cows make milk and the techniques used to make it safe to drink. Through learning about the mammary gland and how the blood flow in cows helps provide the necessary nutrients, we have become better educated consumers. For example, prior to the lecture, it could be assumed that most of the governor’s school students were aware that the majority of milk is water, at 87.4%. However, the fact that lactose, one of the milk solids, is the second most common component of milk, is something that most students had not realized.

Even though most people drink every day, and the science behind it has always been available to us, learning the process of how milk is produced is new knowledge for governor’s school students. And with this knowledge, we have gained a better appreciation for the milk.

While the two-ingredient beverage may seem so simple, the background knowledge that the governor’s students have acquired from dairy science classes has granted a new level of appreciation. From learning about the composition of milk, physiology of milk synthesis, and local raised dairy, Virginia Tech has surely offered the true “farm to table” experience.

So the next time you find yourself at a D2, be sure to grab yourself a glass of chocolate milk and rest easy knowing that you’re drinking a local farm-raised and student-praised treasure.

About the Authors:

Sophia Kane is a cellist, cross country runner, and chocolate milk enthusiast. She is a rising senior at Monticello High School, located in Charlottesville, Virginia, and is currently attending Governor’s School for Agriculture.

Rebecca Woodhouse is a rising junior, raised in Northern Virginia. As an avid runner, she loves to spend time outside and with friends. However, she also loves cooking and eating tasty food. She is excited to be spending time at Virginia Tech this summer, not only to learn more about agriculture and meet new people, but to also eat at D2 and consume plenty of good food and fresh chocolate milk.

As a lover of life and knowledge, Rachel Bigelow has been writing since childhood about her travel and social experiences. Born in Hawaii, then living in Iceland, and finding home in Virginia Beach, she has met a lot of different people and developed a passion for sharing her newly learned life lessons with other growing teenagers.

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